Clinker


  1. Properties

Clinker consists of various calcium silicates including alite and beliteTricalcium aluminate and calcium aluminoferrite are other common components. These components are often generated in situ by heating various clays and limestone.[1]

Portland cement clinker is made by heating a homogeneous mixture of raw materials in a rotary kiln at high temperature. The products of the chemical reaction aggregate together at their sintering temperature, about 1,450 °C (2,640 °F). Aluminum oxide and oxide are present only as a flux to reduce the sintering temperature and contribute little to the cement strength. For special cements, such as low heat (LH) and sulfate resistant (SR) types

Portland cement clinker is the essential ingredient of Portland cement. Portland cement is obtained by grinding clinker with only minor amounts of a few other minerals, so its composition does not depart far from that of clinker. Other cements (i.e. non-Portland cements, for example pozzolanic cements, blast furnace slag cements, limestone cements and masonry cements) contain larger amounts of other minerals and have a much wider composition range. Although the other potential ingredients may be cheap natural materials, clinker is made in an energy-intensive chemical process - in a Momtaz Petroasia ltd Co. - and its production is the main concern of this website. Between one and two billion tonnes a year of clinker are made world-wide, and the details of its formation are therefore of great economic significance, since no viable alternative ingredients for making cement-like materials currently exist.

Unlike many other thermal products (e.g. aluminum, pig-iron), clinker is a fairly complex mixture of different minerals, and so its production depends on a multi-dimensional control of raw materials and a multi-staged heat treatment. It has been likened to a "man-made igneous rock", and an understanding of its structure and chemistry requires the application of many principles of geochemistry.

  1. Applications

Portland cement clinker is the essential ingredient of Portland cement. Portland cement is obtained by grinding clinker with only minor amounts of a few other minerals, so its composition does not depart far from that of clinker. Other cements (i.e. non-Portland cements, for example pozzolanic cements, blast furnace slag cements, limestone cements and masonry cements) contain larger amounts of other minerals and have a much wider composition range. Although the other potential ingredients may be cheap natural materials, clinker is made in an energy-intensive chemical process - in a Momtaz Petroasia ltd Co. - and its production is the main concern of this website. Between one and two billion tonnes a year of clinker are made world-wide, and the details of its formation are therefore of great economic significance, since no viable alternative ingredients for making cement-like materials currently exist.

Unlike many other thermal products (e.g. aluminum, pig-iron), clinker is a fairly complex mixture of different minerals, and so its production depends on a multi-dimensional control of raw materials and a multi-staged heat treatment. It has been likened to a "man-made igneous rock", and an understanding of its structure and chemistry requires the application of many principles of geochemistry. 

 

  1. Specifications:

  

 

(%)

 

(%)

MIN

MAX

MIN

MAX

Silicon Dioxide

SiO2

20.00

22.00

Insoluble Residue

I.R.

0.10

0.70

 Aluminium Oxide 

Al2O3

4.60

5.40

Free Lime

Free CaO

0.70

1.40

Ferric Oxide  

Fe2O3

3.50

4.00

Lime Saturation Factor

LSF

0.92

0.97

Calcium Oxide

CaO

63.00

65.00

Silica Module

SiM

2.40

2.60

 Magnesium Oxide

MgO

1.50

2.50

Alomina Module

AlM

1.20

1.50

Sulphur Trioxide  

SO3

1.50

2.50

Tricalcium Silicate

C3S

50.00

60.00

 Potassium Oxide

K2O

0.50

0.70

Dicalcium Silicate

C2S

15.00

25.00

Sodium Oxide

Na2O

0.30

0.50

Tricalcium Aluminate

C3A

5.00

9.00

 Loss on Ignition

L.O.I

0.60

0.100

Tetracalcium Alumino Ferrite

C4AF

10.00

12.00

 

 

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